More advice on advice

I’ve been blogging on the Thesis Whisperer since June 2010 – nearly nine years as I write this post. I started the blog, in part, because I wanted an online resource I could send to students. I’d been working as a research educator for about four years at that time and noticed PhD students asked me the same questions over and over: how do I start my discussion section?, What is theory? What’s the best way to take notes? How do you write so fast? How do I put publications in my PhD?.

I thought it would take six months to write everything down. Happily I was wrong and I still find the blog a stimulating, creative space to share my research and teaching.

Image by @punttim on Unsplash

I’m fortunate that many people have taken up the invitation to write for the Whisperer: this is important for a number of reasons. Through listening to stories we all get smarter. Other people have valuable perspectives and experiences to share and I am grateful they see the Whisperer as a vehicle. If you’re a long time reader you might notice I have a rhythm to the blog. You get a post a week: one week it will be a community member the next week it will be me. By only posting on alternate weeks, I weave my voice into the voices of others. There’s no doubt this makes the blog more interesting – and more sustainable for me (if I had to write 1000 words every week I think I would have given up long ago!).

I get about two or three story pitches a week and, over time, I have developed a rubric for whether I accept a community member post or not. I rarely reject a post, but I do sometimes ask people to change their post before publication and sometimes I edit heavily. The most common reason I ask for a revise and resubmit is when people send me a fairly similar version of ‘lessonsI learned from doing a PhD’. Without realising it, when they reflect on the PhD process, students say the same kinds of thing. This similarity is easy to explain: we all work within a system and this puts similar pressures on each one of us. It’s not surprising advice for dealing with the system tends to converge around the same kind of topics: choosing good supervisors; being organised; qualities of persistence and resilience; keeping to a writing schedule; learning to fail; staying healthy and so on.

I never reject the ‘lessons learned’ story pitches out of hand – usually there is something new and interesting to say because every person has a unique journey through the PhD. If can find this angle in the first draft I suggest the person rewrites it with their unique angle front and centre. It might be that they did a PhD by publication, or that they studied at a distance, were coping with a chronic illness or condition, had lots of kids or were a minority in their department (I wish I had more of this last type – hint hint!). Most people are happy to do this rewrite, realising how useful it will be to others facing similar circumstances to share their very specific tips. These posts don’t speak to everyone and often don’t get many hits initially. However, over time they become the ‘go to’ post for people who google this specific circumstance. I like the idea that these specific advice posts stay on the blog as a public service for those facing similar issues.

Sometimes I am sent ‘lessons learned’ posts that people have already published the post on their own blog. They kindly offer it as content I might like to republish, but I usually refuse. I try to work by the spirit of generosity: it’s better to promote their blog through social media than be greedy and use their content on mine. Recently I agreed to do this for yet another post and started to think about how to make this sharing practice have more impact by making a compilation. I asked on Twitter for people to share advice posts they have written on their own blog. I got quite a number of them and expect that more will appear in the comments to this post.

Below is the beginning of a guide to other PhD student advice posts, starting with the ones I’ve been sent so far. I consider all these posts to offer ‘generic advice’ – not because they are bad or boring, but because they share good, common sense advice that is applicable to most people doing a PhD. I had a fun afternoon reading all of them: there are some excellent tips and observations in here, which I imagine will be useful to anyone starting – or trying to finish.

I will add more posts to the list over time – possibly as a section on my Community page. I’m still interested in publishing more unique accounts and perspectives on the Whisperer, so if you have one, please send it in!

Advice from future Dave

Things I learned the hard way (in graduate school)

Oh the places you’ll go! Reflecting on my PhD journey

My thesis tis done… the end of the beginning

Reflections on my PhD journey

20 things I wish I’d known when I started my PhD

#PhDing… while taking comprehensive exams (US system specific advice)

Tips and Tricks for PhD students (the #phdlifehack)

5 pieces of advice for aspiring PhD students 

How to survive a thesis defence

5 years into academia – 45 things I have learned so far

Things a scientist should know

What I now know about the doctorate: illuminating the PhDarkness

Don’t do a PhD

Things I wish someone had told me when I started my PhD

To fund or not to self fund your PhD (you’ll need to scroll down a bit to get to this section)

What I learned in my first term as a PhD researcher

10 things I wish I’d known 10 years ago (warning – heaps of amazing links here. Don’t open unless you plan to spend the next two hours following them. I speak from experience!)

10 things I wish I knew when I started my PhD

Three things I wish I knew before starting a PhD

University email: a PhD exit strategy (little discussed, but very important information)

Advice for doing a PhD (A compendium of advice from Twitter)

PhD life: defeating isolation

I’m sure there are many more than this list, perhaps you are a PhD student with a blog and have posted one you would like to share? Or you might just want to share that piece of advice you found genuinely helpful? Interested to hear from you in the comments!

Related Posts

Five time management ideas – from part time PhD students

Coping strategies for full time workers who become PhD students

Love the Thesis whisperer and want it to continue? Consider becoming a $1 a month Patreon and get special, Patreon only, extra Thesiswhisperer content every two weeks!

3 thoughts on “More advice on advice

  1. Dear Thesis Whisperer,

    I hope my email find you well.

    I am writing to ask whether you would be interested in publishing an article I’ve written about creating your own opportunities (hereby attached). I am open to making any adjustment you see fit.

    If you think that this is something that would be suitable for your audience, then I’d love to hear back from you.

    Best wishes, Katherine Bassil, MSc. PhD Candidate | Podcast Host Website katherinebassil.com Personal ☏ (+31) 6 14477890

    >

  2. Adding my colleague Kate West’s wonderful blog here: https://www.dyslexicacademic.com/

    She describes the blog as ‘a digital space where academics respond to the resounding silence in the academy surrounding our learning differences including but not limited to dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, autism spectrum disorder, visual stress or Irlen syndrome, attention deficit disorder, synaesthesia, and aphantasia, as well as our co-occurring mental health differences including but not limited to obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, and depression.’

Leave a Reply to Thesis Whisperer Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s